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Winged bean/Asparagus bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus)

The winged bean is not widely grown in this country, but is a major staple in India, Asia, the South Pacific and neighbouring Papua New Guinea. The greatest diversity of varieties of this plant occurs in the later country where it is a predominant food plant.

The origins of this plant are shrouded in mystery. Like many cultivated plants, it is believed to now be extinct in the wild. Proposed origins of this plant include south India, Asia and Madagascar. The plant has been in cultivation for over 6,000 years, making it one of the oldest recorded food crops. Its closest relations are found in central Africa.

The winged bean is distinctive having four corners with distinctive ruffled wings. It is large and juicy with a great flavour resembling the familiar green bean (Phasaeolus vulgaris). It is particularly delicious in stir fries. An added bonus is that it is high in protein – 34% dried weight and 17% oil.

 
From a 4 page Feature Article in Issue Eleven
 
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SPECIAL ONLINE CONTENT

The below item complements this article read in the current issue:

More details of edible flowers of palms, waterlilies, succulents and native edible flowers (p. 83)

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There is nothing more spectacular than garnishing salads, savory or sweet dishes with delicious edible flowers. Most of us are aware that there is a large range of plants with edible flowers, but the various books and magazines seem to list the same flowers.

Coming from cooler climes, these plants often require a little more love or attention in our gardens.

The good news is that there are many hardy plants with edible flowers that thrive in warmer climates. That’s to be expected, as we live in the climate zone with the world’s greatest biodiversity. You probably already have some in your own garden.

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Eleven
 
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- Hedge it
- Train it
- Pot it
- Go Up
- Go wide
- Go down
- Try small
- Try bold
- Try unusual
- Think drink
- Think punch
- Eat native

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Eleven
 
Prev Page Main Page Next Page Top Of Page
 
 
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