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Located a short 40 kilometres north of Brisbane and 9 kilometres from the coast, this acreage garden has captured the heart of country living while capitalising on the milder climate of coastal South East Queensland living.

Debby and Peter Gruythuysen have over a ten year period created a garden that once was predominately an undulating horse paddock vegetated by gum trees, wattles (Acacia species) and sheaoks (Allocasaurina species). With no set plan, the garden evolved and expanded into a country style garden with sweeping expanses of lawns and garden beds appreciated by wildlife and the owners.d the mood. Needless to say that garden owners are very patient souls.

A degree of sustainability is worked into the garden. Chickens, an assortment of fruiting trees and the herb and vegetable garden go some way in achieving this. The vegetable garden is most productive until Christmas then the climate tends to be too hot. Herbs are positioned closer to the house in containers and are more easily cared for over summer. Holes in leaves of the leaf vegetables are a good tell-tale sign of no chemicals used in the garden.

“Since we are both from the country our garden gives us the same sense of peace as being out in the country…we love the feeling of space and tranquillity.”

 
From a 6 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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SPECIAL ONLINE CONTENT

The below item complements this article read in the current issue:

The Gardens of the Bali Hyatt – extra text (p. 14)

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Situated on the east coast of Bali, in the serene village of Sanur, the Bali Hyatt is a traditional or classic Balinese resort. The front garden presents an expansive parkland space with its welcoming gardens and broad open space, with the inner and rear grounds a tropical wonderland of pathways, ponds, slopes and plant features. Ponds are dominant in this resort, exemplifying the Balinese experience with their calmness and sensitivity to culture and the environment.

The Balinese are in harmony with nature and these gardens reflect this well. There is a unity between the gardens and the buildings, giving the impression that the buildings are nestled within the garden – from the open air lobby with its soaring pitched roof made from coconut beams covered in thatched elephant grass with parquetry floors to the open air restaurants with thatched roofs and views out across the gardens and ponds.

 
From a 6 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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o say that gardeners are obsessed with colour could be a slight exaggeration, but one only has to go to some of the world’s great garden festivals to see them “ooh” and “aah” over the most colourful displays. A few years ago there was a saying in the nursery industry that “colour sells” and nothing epitomises that more effectively than to watch shoppers, in the height of the azalea or poinsettia season, being captivated by the massed displays of full bloom.

It is no coincidence that the mass merchandisers set out their plant displays in high traffic areas because they know that a fair proportion of shoppers will not only stop to admire the vibrant colours – more than a few will buy one, even though it was never on their shopping list.

 
From a 4 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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Additional blue flowering plants (p. 28)

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Magazine Features:

Blue Mist Flower
(Bartlettina sordida syn.
Eupatorium megalophyllum)

Brilliantasia
(Brilliantasia subulugurica)

Tree Wisteria
(Bolusanthus speciosus)

Native Daisy
(Brachyscome multifida)

Yesterday Today Tomorrow (Brunfelsia pauciflora)

Native Wisteria
(Callerya megasperma)

False Plumbago
(Ceratostigma willmottianum)

Butterfly Pea
(Clitoria ternatea)

Blue Ginger
(Dichorisandra thyrsiflora)

Sky Flower
(Duranta erecta ‘Geisha Girl’)

Blue Sage
(Eranthemum pulchellum)

Blue Sapphire
(Evolvulus pilosus ‘Blue Daze’)

Cherrypie (Heliotropium
arborescens
’Sir Robert’)

Purple Pea Bush
(Hovea acutifolia)

Ribbon Bush
(Hypoestes aristata)

Australian Harebell
(Isotoma axillaris)

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
‘Lucy Margaret’

Blue Potato Bush (Lycianthes rantonnetii syn. Solanum rantonnetii)

Climbing Snapdragon (Maurandya barclayana syn. Asarina barclayana)

White Cedar (Melia azedarach
var. australasica)

Walking Iris (Neomarica gracilis)

Native Iris (Patersonia sericea)

Blue Wreath Vine (Petrea volubilis)

Plumbago (Plumbago auriculata)

Butterfly Bush (Rotheca myricoides syn. Clerodendrum ugandense)

Fairy Fan Flower
(Scaevola aemula cultivars)

Paradise Flower
(Solanum wendlandii)

Large-leafed Glory-bush
(Tibouchina heteromalla)

Spice Bromeliad
(Tillandsia cyanea)

Sweet Garlic (Tulbaghia simmleri
syn. T. fragrans)

Arrow-leaved Violet
(Viola betonicifolia)

 
From a 4 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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In the last issue we looked at trying to create a cottage style garden in a subtropical climate. For many enthusiastic gardeners this may be seen as a challenge to their abilities as some enthusiasts do indeed manage to grow species outside their recommended climatic range regardless of what ‘the books’ may say. It is clear that these people carry with them a passionate love of plants and will do almost anything to grow what others struggle to keep alive let alone thrive.

Exceptions to every rule exist in every hobby and gardening is definitely not without its exceptions. Sadly, for the majority of people who have spent many hard hours (or years) trying to grow their favourite rhododendrons, to at least bring forth one single flower bud, the challenge is tiresome and the journey often ends in another disappointing result.

It’s clear that there are many, many species of plant choices that make wonderful alternatives to those often seen in cooler climate gardens. Yet we have only just begun to scratch the surface of what can be used to give our gardens that ‘look’ and friendly atmosphere that a cottage garden can offer.

 
From a 6 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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You may not be familiar with the name, but you are bound to be familiar with the plants. Alternantheras are popular bedding and groundcover plants, grown for their colourful leaves. They are also some of the most popular warm climate vegetable plants.

Ornamental Alternantheras

Joseph’s Coat (Alternanthera ficoidea)

Beet Leaf / Ruby Leaf (Alternanthera brasiliensis – previously A. dentata)


Edible Alternantheras

Brazilian Spinach (Alternanthera sissoo)

Ceylon Spinach, Mukunu-wenna (Alternanthera sessilis)

Red Mukunu-wenna (Alternanthera polygonoides)

Tucker Weed / Native spinach (Alternanthera denticulata)

 
From a 4 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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Most of the native tamarinds are members of the genus Diploglottis, with about 11 species occurring in Australia. All species are highly ornamental, some with spectacular flushes of new growth and impressively large pinnate leaves. Their various habitats range from the rainforests of Cape York to Central New South Wales. The Diploglottis genera bear their fruit as three-lobed capsules that split open to reveal the fleshy aril, which is juicy and refreshingly acidulous.

All the native tamarinds have tasty, juicy fruit suitable for both sweet and savory culinary applications and are well complemented by Lemon Myrtle and the Native Peppers (Tasmannia insipida).

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Thirteen
 
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