Egyptian Spinach  Corchorus olitorius
             
Arno King
   
 

 

   

Egyptian Spinach (Corchorus olitorius) is known by a number of names including Salad Mallow, Bush Ochra, Jute Mallow, Jew’s Mallow, Vegetable Jute, Melokhia and Moluka.

It is an easy to grow annual spinach that thrives in subtropical gardens during the warmer months of the year and all year round in the tropics. It is a very tolerant plant and will grow in a wide range of climates and conditions.

An African vegetable, it is a staple throughout the African continent and is widely grown by the African community in Australia. It was introduced to India and China many hundreds of years ago and is also widely grown and appreciated in those countries.

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Twenty Eight
 
 
Egyptian Spinach (Corchorus olitorius) is a hardy summer vegetable.
 
You may find this vegetable at the markets.
 
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Beetroot  Beta vulgaris
             

Claire Bickle

 

   

Beetroot is a powerhouse root vegetable full of vitamin C, folate, potassium, silica and manganese. Throughout history it has also been widely used as a medicinal plant and a great source of fabric dye. Of course having been in cultivation for 1000s of years there is a multitude of myths and lore associated with this humble purple root tuber.
The swollen root tuber and the young leaves of Beetroot are widely eaten, both being quite tasty in salads. These days a lot people are growing Beetroot as part of their micro green mixes. This involves growing plants to seedling stage and then harvesting them whilst still very small.

Topics covered include:

  • Cultivars
  • Pests/diseases
  • To the table – health attributes

There is also a recipe for Fancy Beetroot Salad.

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Twenty Eight
 
 
Oven roasted beetroot  yummo.
 
Fancy Beetroot Salad.
 
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Star Gooseberry - Phyllanthus acidus
             

Barbara Beerling

 

 

   

Phyllanthus acidus, in the family Euphorbiaceae, is also known as the Malay Gooseberry, Star Gooseberry, Otaheite Gooseberry or simply the Gooseberry Tree. Despite its name, the fruit and plant’s habit do not resemble those of the cold climate gooseberry, except perhaps for the acidity of the fruit.

The small tree reaches 2-9m in height by 2-6m in width. Initially erect in habit when young, it swiftly produces lateral branches to create a spreading bushy crown.

Pinnate leaves are lime green and give the plant a fern-like appearance. The Star Gooseberry looks somewhat similar in appearance to another edible fruit tree of the tropics, the Bilimbi Tree (Averrhoa bilimbi).

The article also covers briefly:

  • Origin and distribution
  • Cultivation
  • Propagation
  • Uses for the fruit

There is a bonus recipe for Star Gooseberry Pickle as well.

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Twenty Eight
 
 
Star Gooseberry.
 
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Cape York Lily, Native Turmeric, Andan  Curcuma australasica.
             

By the Queensland Bushfood Association
Images
Graeme White
Recipe + Image John King

 

Download this Bushfood Recipe as found on p.61 of STG Issue 28.

Bushfood 28

   

Cape York Lily (Curcuma australasica) belongs to the ginger family Zingiberaceae which includes a number of economical species, one of which is the spice Turmeric (Curcuma longa).

The Cape York Lily is a deciduous, herbaceous perennial with a well developed tuberous rhizome. It naturally occurs, as its name suggests, on Cape York in Queensland but its range also extends from the north of the Northern Territory to south of Cairns, around Gordonvale.

In late autumn, the plant dies back to the underground rhizome and goes dormant. As the weather warms the soil in late spring and into early summer along with rainfall, spectacular floral spikes emerge. Flowers can emerge without rainfall as the plant will use its inbuilt reserves from the rhizome.

 
From a 2 page Feature Article in Issue Twenty Eight
 
 
Cape York Lily / Andan (Curcuma australasica) in blender.
 
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